The Church of St. Anselm

 Original design of St Anselm's Church, Kennington, which was never completed

Original design of St Anselm's Church, Kennington, which was never completed

The first church of St. Anselm, a mission hall with church above, was built just south of Sancroft Street in 1887. In 1912 plans were made for a new church by S. D. Adshead and S. C. Ramsey. The foundation stone was laid by the Prince of Wales in 1914, and the walls were carried up to about six to ten feet when the outbreak of war stopped work.  

The church was not completed until 1933.  Owing to lack of funds the original design, which had a Latin cross plan crowned by an elaborate dome, could not be carried out.

 

 

Architectural Description

 St Anselm's in 1933

St Anselm's in 1933

St. Anselm's is a church of simple character built in London stock brick with detail derived from Early Christian basilican churches.  On the road frontage under the gable, which is decorated by a moulded cornice, there is a round window with an architrave surround. The main entrance beneath this window is in stone and is flanked by columns with richly carved capitals. Over the doorway and enclosed by a bold enriched surround is a semicircular tympanum which has a carved panel representing St. Anselm seated between a lion and a lamb. An uncommon feature of St. Anselm's is the stone plinth-seat round its base. At its north-west corner above the clerestory is a small bellcote.  The tall, barn-like interior has timber king post roof trusses a gallery over the entrance and a baldacchino over the altar. There are arcade capitals of cushion shape and carved with plants and animals by A H Gerrard. The carved font is by Derrick Frith.

The murals inside depict Pilgrim's Progress and were painted in 1971 by Norman Adams RA Hon RWS.